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11 Risk Factors of Whiplash - Part Three

WHIPLASH BASICS

Whiplash is a neck injury caused by forceful, uncontrolled neck movements. This type of injury is commonly experienced during a motor vehicle collision, but may also result from other trauma.

Some Common Signs and Symptoms

  • Neck pain, stiffness and soreness
  • Decreased range of motion in the neck
  • Headaches
  • Sharp or shooting pain in the shoulders, upper back, arms, or hands
  • Numbness or tingling sensations in the shoulders, upper back, arms, or hands
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness

This series will identify 11 commonly seen risk factors that contribute to whiplash injuries. We have divided the risk factors into “human (part one and part two),” “vehicular,” and “collision” categories.

VEHICULAR FACTORS (Part Three)

FRONT VS. REAR SEATING

Different seating locations within a vehicle may contribute to the likelihood of experiencing whiplash during a crash. A person occupying the front seat of an automobile has a higher risk of neck injury than passengers in the rear, possibly due to mechanical or head restraint differences.

SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS

Safety features such as the seat belt and shoulder harness should always be worn. Correct use can prevent serious injury, or death. Unfortunately, wearing a seatbelt and shoulder harness may increase the likelihood of experiencing whiplash.

POSITIONING OF HEAD RESTRAINT

For a head restraint to properly protect passengers, it should be a placed at the center of gravity of the occupant’s head, which is located approximately at the level of the top of a person’s ears. If positioned lower, risk of neck injury may be greater.

Depending on an occupant’s height, head restraint position and design may increase the likelihood of a whiplash injury, as some head restraints don’t adequately protect tall occupants.

The 11 Whiplash Risk Factors series concludes in part four with two risk factors in the “collision” category.



Disclaimer
This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about med­i­cine, health, wellness and related sub­jects. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If you or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, it is recommended that you con­sult with an appropriately licensed physi­cian or other health care worker.

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